Microcred - a short-form conference exploring the emerging microcredential ecosystem

microcrEd

A short-form conference
exploring the emerging microcredential ecosystem

HaileyburyX on Soundcloud

Although this event is postponed, you can listen to some of our speakers who share their insights on microcredentialling in education in
HaileyburyX on Soundcloud, season 1.

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Hear from educators, employers and policymakers on how the emerging microcredential ecosystem may evolve
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Network with colleagues and share emerging insights on microcredentialling
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Leave with actionable insights into how your organisation can benefit from the emerging microcredential ecosystem

Microcredentials are nothing new

With roots in the MOOC movement at the start of this decade, Udacity began offering nanodegrees in 2015 tailored to the needs of employers, followed by a variety of for-credit offerings globally.

2020: an expanding ecosystem

Fast-forward to 2020, and we see a rapidly-expanding ecosystem of microcredentials offered by a wide range of organisations - some of them traditional education providers, others commercial players, sometimes in partnership - focusing on different blends of competencies, knowledge and skills in a vast range of domains. There is an emerging industry of digital credentialing which allows learners to warrant their learning and display their achievements via digital badges. The nascent European Common Microcredential Framework aims to lay the foundation for a new international credential for universities. And online engines such as credentialengine.org that aim to create transparency in an expanding credential marketplace and support informed decisions about the value of microcredentials.

Education providers, employers, learners

One of the key issues for this emerging ecosystem is relationships between players in the education system, whether at secondary or post-secondary level; employers who need a pipeline of informed, adaptable and skilled people; and learners, who increasingly seek opportunities to continue learning - whether that's to equip themselves to enter the workforce, defuse the decreasing half-life of skills required to advance, and excel, at work or even stay in the workforce, or just to expand their intellectual horizons.

The Review of the Australian Qualifications Framework recognises the need to embrace the microcredential ecosystem in the context of the Australian education and training system. The review noted that "the traditional role of formal qualifications is challenged by the ready availability of information through the Internet, declining trust in institutions and traditional sources of authority" and that there is a need to recognise shorter form credentials, including microcredentials; and the recent report Making Micro-credentials Work from Deakin University proposes that "the key opportunity is to enable formal qualification systems to evolve to include short form credentials, some of which might be credit-bearing".

But is this the only solution? Do microcredentials need to align with the formal qualification system at all? What does ‘credit’ mean in a disrupted educational ecosystem?

And there are other questions. How do we facilitate new forms of flexible learning that meet the demands of new generations of learners? Are there alternative ways to establish transparency and rigour around learning outcomes? What is the relationship between secondary and post-secondary microcredentials? Is there a need for a scalable, open, transparent, universal taxonomy to help learners and employers make sense of the microcredential ecosystem? What role should employers play in the developing microcredential ecosystem - are they the beneficiaries or the drivers of change? And, finally, how is the voice of the learner heard?

Join us for a short-form conference on these issues and more, at Haileybury's City Campus, one of Melbourne's first vertical schools, on March 13, 2020, where we will hear from educators, employers and policymakers on how the emerging microcredential ecosystem may evolve.

Confirmed speakers at microcrEd include

FIRESIDE CHAT
DAVID BOWSER
CEO CURIO

PANELLIST - MICROCREDENTIALS AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
GERARD DALBOSCO
Managing Partner EY

PANEL HOST - MICROCREDENTIALS IN INDUSTRY
JON KERR
Head of Partnerships BSchool

CAPSTONE
DAVID KINSELLA
Founder Everitas

FIRESIDE CHAT
JOSEPHINE LANG
Academic Programme Director University of Melbourne

PANELLIST - MICROCREDENTIALS AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
MARTINE LETTS
Chief Executive Officer Committee for Melbourne

OPENING KEYNOTE
BEVERLEY OLIVER
Professor Emerita Deakin University

PANELLIST - MICROCREDENTIALS IN INDUSTRY
ANTHONY MORRIS
CEO Cahoot Learning

PANELLIST - MICROCREDENTIALS IN INDUSTRY
ALLYN RADFORD 
Principal Consultant Transforming Credentials

FIRESIDE CHAT
COLETTE ROGERS 
Partner Deloitte

FIRESIDE CHAT
MARY STRAIN
Blockchain Business Development Learning Machine


PANEL HOST - MICROCREDENTIALS AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
DEREK SCOTT
CEO Haileybury

FIRESIDE CHAT HOST
ANNA SEVER
Deputy Principal Haileybury

EVENT HOST
PETER THOMAS
Director HaileyburyX

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KEYNOTE AND CAPSTONE TALKS FROM RECOGNISED THOUGHT LEADERS

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PANELS ON THE PERSPECTIVE of EDUCATION PROVIDERS AND EMPLOYERS

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FIRESIDE CHATS WITH PLAYERS IN THE MICROCREDENTIAL ECOSYSTEM

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Part of the HaileyburyX Ed. series. 

Ed. short-form conference events are our way to learn more about the issues we are interested in - and at the same time nourish our ecosystem. Our events are not dominated by our own point of view. As we say at each event, there is no monopoly on the truth.  This results in an open, candid and challenging exchange of views that widens the aperture on some of the key issues in learning and teaching.

MicrocrEd is part of the HaileyburyX mission to build online courses not just for Haileybury students, but for ELC-12 students anywhere in the world, and to help our teachers, and the whole school community, learn about how we can best use technology to deliver outstanding learning experiences.